At a Glance:

Contact: Hector Celis
Hector Celis, Carpentry Instructor
Phone: 404-225-4621
Campus: Main
Department: Academic Affairs, Academic Affairs, Industrial & Transportation Technologies Division


, Department Chair
Direct: (404) 225-4621



Program Overview

The Carpentry, Diploma program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for careers in the carpentry industry.  Learning opportunities develop academic, occupational, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement.  The program emphasizes a combination of carpentry theory and practical applications necessary for successful employment.  Program graduates receive a carpentry diploma and have the qualifications for an entry - level residential carpenter or entry - level commercial carpenter.

Minimum Program Length: 4 Semesters

Estimated Program Cost: $6,800

Gainful Employment Disclosure

Entrance Requirements

Admissions Requirements

  • Must be 16 years of age
  • Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply
  • Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math
  • Transfer of previous post secondary credits will be determined by the registrar

Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate.




Course Overview

Contact Hours
Credit Hours
Curriculum (51 - 53 hours)
General Education Courses (8 hours)
Emphasizes human relations and professional development in today\'s rapidly changing world that prepares students for living and working in a complex society. Topics include human relations skills, job acquisition skills and communication, job retention skills, job advancement skills, and professional image skills.
Emphasizes the development and improvement of written and oral communication abilities. Topics include analysis of writing, applied grammar and writing skills, editing and proofreading skills, research skills, and oral communication skills.
Emphasizes the application of basic mathematical skills used in the solution of occupational and technical problems. Topics include fractions, decimals, percents, ratios and proportions, measurement and conversion, formula manipulation, technical applications, and basic statistics.
Occupational Courses (38 - 39 hours)

This student success course is designed to transition, connect, and acclimate new students to Atlanta Technical College. The course creates an awareness of various campus resources and holistic skill sets necessary to achieve educational and career success. Through the nurturing of academic, personal, social, occupational, and technological talents, students develop the academic and professional skills necessary to be successful in college and the global community.

Introduces the fundamental concepts, terminology, and operations necessary to use computers. Emphasis is placed on basic functions and familiarity with computer use. Topics include an introduction to computer terminology, the Windows environment, Internet and email, word processing software, spreadsheet software, database software, and presentation software.

This course provides instruction in framing materials and estimation, and framing production of floors, walls, and stairs. Emphasis is placed on practical application of skills. Topics include estimation and computation procedures, rough layouts, and installation procedures.

This course provides instruction in the theory and practical application of skills required to construct ceiling and roof framings and coverings. Topics include systems and materials identification, layout procedures, installation procedures, cost and materials estimation, and safety precautions.
Introduces materials identification, estimation, and installation procedures for exterior finish and trim materials to include window and door units. Emphasis will be placed on competency development through laboratory practice. Topics include: doors and windows, siding types, materials identification, materials estimation, and installation procedures.
This course introduces the procedures and methods for identifying materials, cost estimating, and installation of interior finishes and trim. Topics include materials identification, cost estimating, trim, insulation, doors, gypsum wallboard, and paneling used in finishing jobs.

This course covers the introduction to a residential construction project from start to finish. Topics to include preparing to build, tools and equipment, building foundations, wood frame construction, completing the structure, finish carpentry, construction specialties, and materials and fasteners used in the construction industry.

This course provides instruction in the use of professional tools for the construction trades. Emphasis will be placed on the safe use of each tool discussed. Topics include layout and measuring tools, cutting tools, sawing tools, drilling and boring tools, finishing and fastening tools, general shop tool use, and job site setup.
This course introduces the reading and interpretation of prints and architectural drawings for all of the construction trades. Topics include types of plans, scales, specifications, conventions, and schedules.

This course introduces the student to the basic fundamentals of the construction trades. Topics include Basic Safety, Construction Math, Hand and Power Tools, Construction Drawings, Rigging, Materials Handling, and Job-Site Communication and Work Ethic Skills.

Select One of the Following (3 - 4 hours)
Introduces the concepts and practices of basic site layout, footings, and foundation construction. Students will use layout equipment for onsite laboratory practice. Topics include: zoning restrictions and codes, batter board installation, builder\\\'s level, squaring methods, footings, plot plan interpretation, materials estimation, foundation types, foundation forms, edge forms, waterproofing, soil testing and excavation.
This course provides instruction in the development of construction sites with an emphasis on surveying, materials and processes for concrete forming and usage, and the various methods and materials used in the handling and rigging of steel components.
Complete One of the Following Specializations (5 - 6 hours)
Residential Specialization (6 hours)

This course discusses finishing and trim techniques for residential floors, fireplaces, stairs, and decks. Emphasis will be placed on identification, estimation and installation of various types of finish materials and coverings. The course also introduces locating and installing cabinets and millwork.

The Carpentry Internship/Practicum course allows students the opportunity to complete an internship with a local business or industry, or to undertake a practical project in a lab setting if internship opportunities are not available.
Commercial Specialization (5 hours)
Provides instruction in the identification and installation of a variety of doors, frames, and door hardware for commercial construction applications. Topics include: door types, door hardware, thresholds, weatherstripping, and overhead doors.
The Carpentry Internship/Practicum course allows students the opportunity to complete an internship with a local business or industry, or to undertake a practical project in a lab setting if internship opportunities are not available.