Networking Specialist

Program Overview

The Computer Information Systems - Networking Specialist program is a sequence of courses designed to provide students with an understanding of the concepts, principles, and techniques required in computer information processing. Graduates are to be competent in the general areas of humanities or fine arts, social or behavioral sciences, and natural sciences or mathematics, as well as in the technical areas of computer terminology and concepts, program design and development, and computer networking. Program graduates are qualified for employment as networking specialists.

Entrance Requirements

* Must be 16 years of age * Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply * Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math * Transfer of previous post-secondary credits will be determined by the registrar. Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate.

 

Course Overview

Contact Hours
Credit Hours
General Core Curriculum (69 - 70 hours)
General Education Courses (18 hours)
Area I - Language Arts/Communication (6 hours)
3
45
Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience.
Select One Of The Following (3 hours)
3
45
Emphasizes the student\\\'s ability to read literature analytically and meaningfully and to communicate clearly. Students analyze the form and content of literature in historical and philosophical contexts. Topics include reading and analysis of fiction, poetry, and drama; research; and writing about literature.
SPCH
1101
3
45
Introduces the student to the fundamentals of oral communication. Topics include selection and organization of materials, preparation and delivery of individual and group presentations, analysis of ideas presented by others, and professionalism.
Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences (6 hours)
3
45
Provides a description and analysis of economic operations in contemporary society. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of economic concepts and policies as they apply to everyday life. Topics include basic economic principles; economic forces and indicators; capital and labor; price, competition, and monopoly; money and banking; government expenditures, federal and local; fluctuations in production, employment, and income; and United States economy in perspective
Select One Of The Following (3 hours)
Introduces the major fields of contemporary psychology. Emphasis is on fundamental principles of psychology as a science. Topics include research design, the organization and operation of the nervous system, sensation and perception, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, thinking and intelligence, lifespan development, personality, psychopathology and interventions, stress and health, and social psychology.
3
45
Explores the sociological analysis of society, its culture, and structure. Sociology is presented as a science with emphasis placed on its methodology and theoretical foundations. Topics include basic sociological concepts, socialization, social interaction and culture, social groups and institutions, deviance and social control, social stratification, social change, and marriage and family.
Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics (3 hours)
MATH
1111
3
45
Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry.
Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts (3 hours)
3
45
Emphasizes American literature as a reflection of culture and ideas. A survey of important works in American literature. Includes a variety of literary genres: short stories, poetry, drama, nonfiction, and novels. Topics include literature and culture, essential themes and ideas, literature and history, and research skills.
Technical Courses (51 - 52 hours)
3
75
Introduces the fundamental concepts, terminology, and operations necessary to use computers. Emphasis is placed on basic functions and familiarity with computer use. Topics include an introduction to computer terminology, the Windows environment, Internet and email, word processing software, spreadsheet software, database software, and presentation software.
CIST
1001
4
90
Provides an overview of information systems, computers and technology. Topics include: Information Systems and Technology Terminology, Computer History, Data Representation, Data Storage Concepts, Fundamentals of Information Processing, Fundamentals of Information Security, Information Technology Ethics, Fundamentals of Hardware Operation, Fundamentals of Networking, Fundamentals of the Internet, Fundamentals of Software Design Concepts, Fundamentals of Software, (System and Application), System Development Methodology, Computer Number Systems conversion (Binary and Hexadecimal), Mobile computing.
This course serves to provide students with the knowledge of the fundamentals of computer technology, networking, and security along with the skills required to identify hardware, peripheral, networking, and security components with an introduction to the fundamentals of installing and maintaining computers. Students will develop the skills to identify the basic functionality of the operating system, perform basic troubleshooting techniques, utilize proper safety procedures, and effectively interact with customers and peers. This course is designed to help prepare students for the CompTIA A+ certification examination.
XXX
xxx
CIS Operating Systems Course
3
0
XXX
xxx
Elective
3
0
Introductory-Level Networking Class (18 - 19 hours)
Introduces networking technologies and prepares students to take the CompTIA's broad-based, vendor independent networking certification exam, Network +. This course covers a wide range of material about networking, including local area networks, wide area networks, protocols, topologies, transmission media, and security. Focuses on operating network management systems, and implementing the installation of networks. It reviews cabling, connection schemes, the fundamentals of the LAN and WAN technologies, TCP/IP configuration and troubleshooting, remote connectivity, and network maintenance and troubleshooting. Topics include: basic knowledge of networking technology, network media and topologies, network devices, network management, network tools and network security.
This course teaches students the skills needed to obtain entry-level home network installer jobs. It also helps students develop some of the skills needed to become network technicians, computer technicians, cable installers, and help desk technicians. It provides a hands-on introduction to networking and the Internet using tools and hardware commonly found in home and small business environments. Instructors are encouraged to facilitate field trips and outside-the-classroom learning experiences. Labs include PC installation, Internet connectivity, wireless connectivity, and file and print sharing.
XXX
xxx
Network Security Course
4
0
XXX
xxx
Elective
3
0
select One Of The Following (3 - 4 hours)
Provides an overview of modern operating systems and their use in home and small business environments. Activities will utilize the graphical user interface (GUI) and command line environment (CLI This will include operating system fundamentals; installing, configuring, and upgrading operating systems; managing storage, file systems, hardware and system resources; troubleshooting, diagnostics, and maintenance of operating systems; and networking.
4
90
This course introduces the UNIX/Linux operating system skills necessary to perform entry-level user functions. Topics include: history of UNIX/Linux, login and logout, the user environment, user password change, the file system, hierarchy tree, editors, file system commands as they relate to navigating the file system tree, UNIX/Linux manual help pages, using the UNIX/Linux graphical desktop, and command options. In addition, the student must be able to perform directory and file displaying, creation, deletion, redirection, copying, moving, linking files, wildcards, determining present working directory and changing directory locations.
Choose One of the Following Specializations (16 hours)
XXX
xxx
Cisco Exploration Specialization
16
0
XXX
xxx
Linux/Unix Specialization
16
0
XXX
xxx
Microsoft Specialization
16
0