Hotel/Restaurant/Tourism Management

Program Overview

The Hotel/Restaurant/Tourism Management program prepares students for employment in a variety of positions in today\\\'s Hotel/Restaurant/Tourism management fields. The Hotel/Restaurant/Tourism Management program provides learning opportunities which introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and occupational knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement.

Additionally, the program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills or to retrain in the area of Hotel/Restaurant/Tourism management. Graduates of the program receive a Hotel/Restaurant/Tourism Management Associate of Applied Science Degree.

Entrance Requirements

Admissions Requirements
  • Must be 16 years of age
  • Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply
  • Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math
  • Transfer of previous post secondary credits will be determined by the registrar
  • Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate

 

Course Overview

Contact Hours
Credit Hours
General Education Courses (15 hours)
Area I - Language Arts/Communication (6 hours)
3
45
Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience.
SPCH
1101
3
45
Introduces the student to the fundamentals of oral communication. Topics include selection and organization of materials, preparation and delivery of individual and group presentations, analysis of ideas presented by others, and professionalism.
Area II - Social/Behavioral Sciences (3 hours)
Introduces the major fields of contemporary psychology. Emphasis is on fundamental principles of psychology as a science. Topics include research design, the organization and operation of the nervous system, sensation and perception, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, thinking and intelligence, lifespan development, personality, psychopathology and interventions, stress and health, and social psychology.
Area III - Natural Sciences/Mathematics (3 hours)
Select One of the Following (3 hours)
MATH
1111
3
45
Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry.
Emphasizes algebra, statistics, and mathematics of finance. Topics include fundamental operations of algebra, sets and logic, probability and statistics, geometry, mathematics of voting and districting, and mathematics of finance.
3
45
Emphasizes functions using real-world applications as models. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra; functions and graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions and models; systems of equations; and optional topics in algebra.
Area IV - Humanities/Fine Arts (3 hours)
Select One of the Following (3 hours)
ARTS
1101
3
45
Explores the visual arts and the relationship to human needs and aspirations. Students investigate the value of art, themes in art, the elements and principles of composition, and the materials and processes used for artistic expression. Well-known works of visual art are explored. The course encourages student interest in the visual arts beyond the classroom.
3
45
Emphasizes American literature as a reflection of culture and ideas. A survey of important works in American literature. Includes a variety of literary genres: short stories, poetry, drama, nonfiction, and novels. Topics include literature and culture, essential themes and ideas, literature and history, and research skills.
Explores the philosophic and artistic heritage of humanity expressed through a historical perspective on visual arts, music, and literature. The humanities provide insight into people and society. Topics include historical and cultural developments, contributions of the humanities, and research.
MUSC
1101
3
45
Explores the analysis of well-known works of music, their compositions, and the relationship to their periods. An introduction to locating, acquiring, and documenting information resources lays the foundation for research to include the creative and critical process, the themes of music, the formal elements of composition, and the placing of music in the historical context. Topics include historical and cultural development represented in musical arts.
Occupational Courses (51 hours)
3
75
Introduces the fundamental concepts, terminology, and operations necessary to use computers. Emphasis is placed on basic functions and familiarity with computer use. Topics include an introduction to computer terminology, the Windows environment, Internet and email, word processing software, spreadsheet software, database software, and presentation software.
Provides the student with an overview of occupations in the hospitality industry. Emphasizes the various segments of each occupation and the interrelated responsibilities for customer service which exist across the hospitality industry. Topics include: development of the hospitality industry, food and beverage services, hotel services, meeting and convention services, management\'s role in the hospitality industry, and hospitality industry trends.
Introduces students to the importance of the travel agent in the hospitality industry and provides an understanding of international, national, state, major cities and their points of interest to the travel customer. Emphasis is placed on career options, industry trends, travel documents, identifying why people travel and how geography is linked to their needs. Topics include: terminology, agency operations, travel reference guides, airline industry, other transportation modes, hotels and resorts, individual travel needs, travel and tourism careers, miscellaneous services, geographical and physical aspects of the Americas and Greenland, Europe, Middle East and Africa, Far East, Australia, New Zealand and Pacific Islands, and travel regulations and documents needed to travel internationally.
Provides students with an orientation to the duties and responsibilities of the tour operator and an overview of the cruise industry. The course also gives students an opportunity to gain the technical knowledge and skills needed to utilize computerized reservation and information systems. Emphasis is placed on the operator's role in planning and conducting tours and cruises as well as accessing data bases and identifying options which satisfy customer's needs. Topics include: planning individual tours, planning group tours, transportation arrangements, accommodation options, entertainment options, foreign country tours, and manager's on-tour responsibilities the ship, living quarters, amenities, shipboard activities, and marketing, selling of cruises, agency computer hardware, computer reservation systems, automated travel information, back-room accounting, and trends in automated travel data systems.
This course focuses on professionalism in a variety of business settings. Topics include professional image and conduct at work, telephone etiquette, table manners, oral and written communication skills, and diversity in the hospitality industry.
This course focuses on the organization and management of lodging operations. It covers day-to-day operations of each department in a hotel and helps students to understand what seasoned managers do. Emphasis is placed on the rooms division. Topics include corporate structures, departmental responsibilities, hotel services and staff, decision making, and industry trends.
HRTM
1150
3
45
This course introduces students to event planning requirements. Topics include fundamentals of event planning; selecting event dates and venues; developing agendas, time lines, budgets, and contracts; marketing events, and facilitating events.
Provides students with a study of food and beverage operations and management. Emphasis is placed on the successful operation of a food and beverage establishment. Topics include restaurants, owners, locations, and concepts; business plans, financing, and legal and tax matters; menus, kitchens, and purchasing; restaurant operations and management.
3
45
Introduces students to marketing techniques associated with hotel/restaurant/tourism fields with emphasis on identifying and satisfying needs of customers. Topics include: marketing introduction, research and analysis, marketing strategies, marketing plans, social media marketing, branding, positioning, sales and advertising. Because of the constant change in marketing strategies in the hospitality industry, this course will also focus on new marketing techniques that are being used in the hospitality industry.
HRTM
1210
3
45
Introduces the student to local, state, federal, and international laws which govern the hospitality industry. Emphasis is placed on creating a workplace where compliance with the law, adherence to ethical standards, and stressing security and loss prevention are the basis for every decision. Topics include civil law, the structure of hospitality enterprises, government agencies that impact the hospitality industry, preventative legal management, contracts, employee selection and management, duties and obligations to employees and guests, and crisis management.
This courses focuses on the principles of good supervision and leadership as they apply to day-to-day hospitality operations. Topics include recruiting, selection, orientation, compensation and benefits, motivation, teamwork, coaching, employee training and development, performance standards, discipline, employee assistance programs, health and safety, conflict management, communicating and delegating, and decision making and control.
HRTM
1230
3
127
Introduces students to the application and reinforcement of hotel/restaurant/travel operational principles, in an actual job placement or practicum experience. Students are acquainted with occupational responsibilities through realistic work situations and are provided with insights into management applications on the job. Topics include: problem solving, adaptability to the job setting, use of proper interpersonal skills, application of hotel/restaurant/travel management techniques, and professional development. The occupation-based instruction is implemented through the use of a practicum or internship and all of the following: written individualized training plans, written performance evaluation, and a required weekly seminar.
XXX
xxx
Specific Occupational Electives
15
0
Occupational Courses (3 - 4 hours)
4
75
Introduces the basic financial accounting concepts of the complete accounting cycle and provides the student with the necessary skills to maintain a set of books for a sole proprietorship. Topics include: accounting vocabulary and concepts, the accounting cycle for a personal service business, the accounting cycle for a merchandising business, inventory, cash control and receivables. Laboratory work demonstrates theory presented in class.
This course provides students with the fundamental knowledge to interpret and analyze the key reports and financial statements used daily in the hospitality industry. Focusing on Profit and Loss statements, students learn to use numbers to assess the performance of individual departments and the overall operation. These numbers are the basis for managerial decisions that increase revenues and control costs.