Surgical Technology

Program Overview

The Surgical Technology program prepares students for employment in a variety of positions in the surgical field. The Surgical Technology program provides learning opportunities which introduce, develop, and reinforce academic and technical knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program admits 12 students once a year, with an application deadline of May 1st. The program is offered on a full-time basis during daytime hours. There is no online option. Additionally, the program provides opportunities to upgrade present knowledge and skills or to retrain in Surgical Technology. Students are wholly responsible for all transportation to and from clinical facilities and are financially responsible for their clinical uniforms and laboratory clothing. Once admitted, students must maintain current CPR certification and maintain a B average or better to remain in good standing. Graduates of the program receive a Surgical Technology degree and are qualified for employment as surgical technologists.

Entrance Requirements

 Admissions Requirements

1.  Must be 17 years of age

2. Complete and sign application for admission and pay a nonrefundable fee to Atlanta Technical College Admissions Office..

3. Complete a Surgical Technology Program application for admission.

4. Submit letter of Intent/application to the ATC Surgical Technology Program.  This form is included inside the ST application packet.

5. Upon conditional acceptance into the program the student must submit criminal background check, Drug Test and Physical.  Provide a copy of valid American Heart Association CPR card (needs to be valid for program duration)   along with application documents.  Criminal background checks and drug screen will be required at various intervals throughout the program as designated by the program faculty.

6. Attend Program Information Sessions (mandatory).  The Surgical Technology Program will host Information Sessions with detailed description of the program and the admission process. Student will gain useful information regarding program costs, program requirements, program course information etc.

7. Submit official High-School or GED transcripts and/or official college transcripts from all colleges attended in the past to the Admissions Office (see General Admissions Requirements).

8. Selection Process:  Weighting will be assigned to students who have completed college courses, and have a minimum grade of (B) in BIOL 2113 & Lab, BIOL 2114 & Lab, BIOL 2117 & Lab, ENGL 1101 and MATH 1111

For students who have not taken college level courses: Weighting will be assigned to High School Graduates' overall GPA, MATH and SCIENCE courses.

9. Requirements for transferring courses from another approved institution includes ensuring BIOL 2113 & Lab, BIOL 2114 & Lab, BIOL 2117 & Lab, MATH 1111, are less than five (5) years old.

10. Valid COMPASS, ASSET, SAT, or ACT test scores comparable to the Associate Degree level.

11. Must have AVERAGE or above average score on the HOBET test within the last three (3) years.

12. Must be identified as Program Ready by Atlanta Technical College for the Surgical Technology Program.

 

Additional Requirements for the competitive admissions process:

1. Attend a Surgical Technology program advisement session in the year for which admission is sought.

2. Complete a total of forty (16) hours of volunteer, observation, or work experience ideally in more than one medical setting.

3. The program requires a full-time commitment from the student as classes are scheduled daily from 8:00am-4:00pm

 

*If the above criteria are not met, an applicant's file cannot be processed for selection into the Surgical Technology Program.*

 

Course Overview

Contact Hours
Credit Hours
General Core Curriculum (15 hours)
3
45
Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience.
MATH
1111
3
45
Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry.
SPCH
1101
3
45
Introduces the student to the fundamentals of oral communication. Topics include selection and organization of materials, preparation and delivery of individual and group presentations, analysis of ideas presented by others, and professionalism.
Introduces the major fields of contemporary psychology. Emphasis is on fundamental principles of psychology as a science. Topics include research design, the organization and operation of the nervous system, sensation and perception, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, thinking and intelligence, lifespan development, personality, psychopathology and interventions, stress and health, and social psychology.
Explores the philosophic and artistic heritage of humanity expressed through a historical perspective on visual arts, music, and literature. The humanities provide insight into people and society. Topics include historical and cultural developments, contributions of the humanities, and research.
Program Specific General Core Curriculum (12 hours)
3
45
Introduces the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the development of a systemic perspective of anatomical structures and physiological processes. Topics include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous and sensory systems.
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2113. The laboratory exercises for this course include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous sensory systems.
Continues the study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and reproductive system.
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2114. The laboratory exercises for this course include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and reproductive system.
3
45
Provides students with a foundation in basic microbiology with emphasis on infectious disease. Topics include microbial diversity, microbial cell biology, microbial genetics, interactions and impact of microorganisms and humans, microorganisms and human disease.
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2117. The laboratory exercises for this course include microbial diversity, microbial cell biology, microbial genetics, interactions and impact of microorganisms and humans, and microorganisms and human disease.
Occupational Curriculum (46 hours)
3
75
Introduces the fundamental concepts, terminology, and operations necessary to use computers. Emphasis is placed on basic functions and familiarity with computer use. Topics include an introduction to computer terminology, the Windows environment, Internet and email, word processing software, spreadsheet software, database software, and presentation software.
Introduces the elements of medical terminology. Emphasis is placed on building familiarity with medical words through knowledge of roots, prefixes, and suffixes. Topics include: origins (roots, prefixes, and suffixes), word building, abbreviations and symbols, and terminology related to the human anatomy.
Provides an overview of the surgical technology profession and develops the fundamental concepts and principles necessary to successfully participate on a surgical team. Topics include: orientation to surgical technology; biomedical principles; asepsis and the surgical environment; basic instrumentation and equipment; principles of the sterilization process; application of sterilization principles; and minimally invasive surgery. (There are surgical procedures that are similar as far as procedural steps, instrumentation, supplies, patient position, etc. This is referred to as the "Co-Related Procedures Concept."" The purpose of using the Co-Related Procedures Concept is to provide the instructor additional time to teach surgical procedures as well as avoid repetition)."
Provides continued study of surgical team participation by wound management and technological sciences for the operating room. Topics include: biophysical diversities and needs; pre-operative routine; intra-operative routine; wound management; post-operative patient care; and outpatient surgical procedures. (There are surgical procedures that are similar as far as procedural steps, instrumentation, supplies, patient position, etc. This is referred to as the "Co-Related Procedures Concept."" The purpose of using the Co-Related Procedures Concept is to provide the instructor additional time to teach surgical procedures as well as avoid repetition)."
2
30
Introduces the fundamentals of surgical microbiology. Topics include: cell structure, introduction to microbiology, microorganisms, process of infection, hypersensitivity, fluid movement concepts, and immunologic defense mechanisms.
2
45
Introduces the fundamentals of intraoperative pharmacology, and emphasizes concepts of anesthesia administration. Topics include: weights and measurements, drug conversions, interpretation of drug orders, legal aspects of drug administration, intraoperative pharmacologic agents, and anesthesia fundamentals.
4
60
Introduces the core general procedures, including the following: incisions; wound closure; operative pathology; and common complications as applied to general and specialty surgery. Topics include: introduction to surgical procedures; general surgery and special techniques; obstetrical and gynecological surgery; gastrointestinal surgery; genitourinary surgery; otorhinolaryngologic surgery; and orthopedic surgery. (There are surgical procedures that are similar as far as procedural steps, instrumentation, supplies, patient position, etc. This is referred to as the "Co-Related Procedures Concept."" The purpose of using the Co-Related Procedures Concept is to provide the instructor additional time to teach surgical procedures as well as avoid repetition)."
4
60
Continues development of student knowledge and skills applicable to specialty surgery areas. Topics include: ophthalmic surgery; thoracic surgery; vascular surgery; cardiovascular surgery; neurosurgery; and plastic and reconstructive surgery. (There are surgical procedures that are similar as far as procedural steps, instrumentation, supplies, patient position, etc. This is referred to as the "Co-Related Procedures Concept."" The purpose of using the Co-Related Procedures Concept is to provide the instructor additional time to teach surgical procedures as well as avoid repetition)."
Orients students to the clinical environment and provides experience with basic skills necessary to the surgical technologist. Topics include, but are not limited to: scrubbing, gowning, gloving, and draping; assistance with patient care; processing of instruments and supplies; maintenance of a sterile field; and environmental sanitation. In addition, introduces the development of surgical team participation through clinical experience. Emphasis is placed on observation and/or participation in routine procedures for core and specialty surgery. Topics include: general surgery (to include gastrointestinal), cardiothoracic surgery, otorhinolaryngologic surgery (ENT), ophthalmic surgery (Eye), genitourinary surgery, neurological surgery, obstetrical and gynecological surgery, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthopedic surgery, peripheral vascular surgery, plastic and reconstructive surgery, and procurement/transplant surgery. The total number of cases the student must complete is 120. Students are required to complete 30 cases in the General Surgery specialty. Twenty of the cases must be in the First Scrub Role. Students are required to complete 90 cases in various surgical specialties. Sixty of the cases must be in the First Scrub Role and evenly distributed between a minimum of 5 surgical specialties. However, 15 is the maximum number of cases that can be counted in any one surgical specialty. Diagnostic endoscopy cases and vaginal delivery cases are not mandatory, but up to 10 diagnostic endoscopic cases and 5 vaginal delivery cases can be counted toward the maximum number of Second Scrub Role cases. Cases that are in the Observation role must be documented but do not count towards the minimum of 120 total cases.
Orients students to the clinical environment and provides experience with basic skills necessary to the surgical technologist. Topics include, but are not limited to: scrubbing, gowning, gloving, and draping; assistance with patient care; processing of instruments and supplies; maintenance of a sterile field; and environmental sanitation. In addition, introduces the development of surgical team participation through clinical experience. Emphasis is placed on observation and/or participation in routine procedures for core and specialty surgery. Topics include: general surgery (to include gastrointestinal), cardiothoracic surgery, otorhinolaryngologic surgery (ENT), ophthalmic surgery (Eye), genitourinary surgery, neurological surgery, obstetrical and gynecological surgery, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthopedic surgery, peripheral vascular surgery, plastic and reconstructive surgery, and procurement/transplant surgery. The total number of cases the student must complete is 120. Students are required to complete 30 cases in the General Surgery specialty. Twenty of the cases must be in the First Scrub Role. Students are required to complete 90 cases in various surgical specialties. Sixty of the cases must be in the First Scrub Role and evenly distributed between a minimum of 5 surgical specialties. However, 15 is the maximum number of cases that can be counted in any one surgical specialty. Diagnostic endoscopy cases and vaginal delivery cases are not mandatory, but up to 10 diagnostic endoscopic cases and 5 vaginal delivery cases can be counted toward the maximum number of Second Scrub Role cases. Cases that are in the Observation role must be documented but do not count towards the minimum of 120 total cases.
Orients students to the clinical environment and provides experience with basic skills necessary to the surgical technologist. Topics include, but are not limited to: scrubbing, gowning, gloving, and draping; assistance with patient care; processing of instruments and supplies; maintenance of a sterile field; and environmental sanitation. In addition, introduces the development of surgical team participation through clinical experience. Emphasis is placed on observation and/or participation in routine procedures for core and specialty surgery. Topics include: general surgery (to include gastrointestinal), cardiothoracic surgery, otorhinolaryngologic surgery (ENT), ophthalmic surgery (Eye), genitourinary surgery, neurological surgery, obstetrical and gynecological surgery, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthopedic surgery, peripheral vascular surgery, plastic and reconstructive surgery, and procurement/transplant surgery. The total number of cases the student must complete is 120. Students are required to complete 30 cases in the General Surgery specialty. Twenty of the cases must be in the First Scrub Role. Students are required to complete 90 cases in various surgical specialties. Sixty of the cases must be in the First Scrub Role and evenly distributed between a minimum of 5 surgical specialties. However, 15 is the maximum number of cases that can be counted in any one surgical specialty. Diagnostic endoscopy cases and vaginal delivery cases are not mandatory, but up to 10 diagnostic endoscopic cases and 5 vaginal delivery cases can be counted toward the maximum number of Second Scrub Role cases. Cases that are in the Observation role must be documented but do not count towards the minimum of 120 total cases.
Orients students to the clinical environment and provides experience with basic skills necessary to the surgical technologist. Topics include, but are not limited to: scrubbing, gowning, gloving, and draping; assistance with patient care; processing of instruments and supplies; maintenance of a sterile field; and environmental sanitation. In addition, introduces the development of surgical team participation through clinical experience. Emphasis is placed on observation and/or participation in routine procedures for core and specialty surgery. Topics include: general surgery (to include gastrointestinal), cardiothoracic surgery, otorhinolaryngologic surgery (ENT), ophthalmic surgery (Eye), genitourinary surgery, neurological surgery, obstetrical and gynecological surgery, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthopedic surgery, peripheral vascular surgery, plastic and reconstructive surgery, and procurement/transplant surgery. The total number of cases the student must complete is 120. Students are required to complete 30 cases in the General Surgery specialty. Twenty of the cases must be in the First Scrub Role. Students are required to complete 90 cases in various surgical specialties. Sixty of the cases must be in the First Scrub Role and evenly distributed between a minimum of 5 surgical specialties. However, 15 is the maximum number of cases that can be counted in any one surgical specialty. Diagnostic endoscopy cases and vaginal delivery cases are not mandatory, but up to 10 diagnostic endoscopic cases and 5 vaginal delivery cases can be counted toward the maximum number of Second Scrub Role cases. Cases that are in the Observation role must be documented but do not count towards the minimum of 120 total cases.
Prepares students for entry into careers as surgical technologists and enables them to effectively prepare for the national certification examination. Topics include: professional credentialing, certification review, and test-taking skills.