At a Glance:

Debra Kendall
Debra Kendall, Radiology Tech, Radiologic Tech, Program Director
Phone: 404-225-4432
Email:
Department: Academic Affairs, Health & Public Safety Technologies, Radiologic Technology
, M.Ed., R.T.(R)(CV)(QA)(CT)
Program Director
404.225.4432

 

Radiologic Technology

Program Overview

Program Overview


The Radiologic Technology associate degree program is a sequence of courses that prepares students for positions in radiology departments and related businesses and industries. Learning opportunities develop academic, technical, and professional knowledge and skills required for job acquisition, retention, and advancement. The program emphasizes a combination of didactic and clinical instruction necessary for successful employment. Program graduates receive an associate of applied science degree, have the qualifications of a radiographer, and are eligible to sit for a national certification examination for radiographers.

Mission Statement, Goals and Learning Outcomes

Mission Statement, Goals and Learning Outcomes

"Consistent with the vision and mission statements of Atlanta Technical College, the Radiologic Technology Program will be a leader in workforce development by providing an educational experience that prepares graduates with the necessary skills and proficiency required of a competent entry-level technologist, while reinforcing a strong work ethic."

Goal #1   Students will be clinically competent

Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Students/graduates will apply proper positioning skills
  • Students/graduates will select proper technical factors
  • Students/graduates will properly utilize radiation protection techniques (ALARA)


Goal #2   Students will communicate effectively

Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Students/graduates will demonstrate good written communication skills.
  • Students/graduates will demonstrate good age specific oral communication skills.


 Goal#3   Students will demonstrate good critical thinking and problem solving skills

Student Learning Outcome:

  • Students will adjust technical factors based on patient conditions.
  • Students/graduates will adapt standard procedures for non-routine patients
  • Students/graduates will critique images to determine diagnostic quality


Goal #4   Students will behave in a compassionate, ethical and professional manner
Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Students/graduates will demonstrate proper work ethics
  • Students will summarize the value of life-long learning

 

Entrance Requirements

Program admission requirements


The Atlanta Technical College Radiologic Technology Program is accredited by the Joint Review Commission on Education in Radiologic Technology.  http://www.jrcert.org

  • Must be 18 years of age    Enrolled as a student at Atlanta Technical College

  • Official high school or GED transcript is required to apply.

  • Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, Language, and Math

  • Transfer of previous post secondary credits will be determined by the registrar.


Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens.  These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course.  Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure.  Students should contact their program directors for more information.


Application Process: The program admits students once per year during summer semester for fall semester. Applicants must submit all required documentation to the Admissions office by the requested due date to receive consideration in the selection process.   Applicants must be in good academic standing at the time of selection to receive consideration as candidates for admission. Applicants not selected for the program may reapply during subsequent admission intake periods. Applicants must complete the application process for each attempt at program entry.


Radiologic Technology is a limited enrollment-competitive program.  Submit Radiologic Technology Admission Packet to the Radiologic Technology program office after completing the following steps:


1.       Complete core courses (general education coursework) prior to making application to the Radiologic Technology program.  This would include all general education courses required for graduation with an Associate of Applied Science degree from the state of Georgia. This includes the following courses specific to the Radiologic Technology program:

  • English 1101 Composition & Rhetoric
  • Speech 1101 Public Speaking

  • Psychology 1101 Introduction to Psychology

  • Health Science 1090 Medical Terminology "B" or better

  • Math 1111 College Algebra "B" or better

  • Biology 2113 Anatomy & Physiology I and its lab component "B" or better

  • Biology 2114 Anatomy & Physiology II and its lab component "B" or better


All science based courses must have been completed within the past five years with a grade of "B" or better.

 To meet eligibility for the Radiologic Technology Program, the student must achieve a minimum, overall cumulative GPA of 3.3 in the prerequisite courses.

 
1.       Attend Program Information Session (mandatory).  The Radiologic Technology Program will host Information Sessions for students interested in a detailed description of the program and the admission process. Students will gain useful information regarding program costs, program requirements, program course information etc.  The dates for information sessions will be posted.

2.       Submit scores for the HESI-2 assessment examination.  We encourage you to take this assessment when you have completed or nearly completed BIOL 2114 and ALHS 1090.  Dates for testing will be emailed to all known prospective students.  You must score 70 or greater in the three required sections to be considered.


For additional selection points:

    -If you score at least 80% on ALL required content exams, you will earn 10 additional points

    -If you score at least 90% on ALL required content exams, you will earn 15 additional points.

3.       Submit an application to the ATC Radiologic Technology program.  This form is included inside the Radiologic Technology application packet (distributed during the information session).

4.       Provide unofficial copies of college transcripts and documentation of required immunizations with the Radiologic Technology Program Application.

 
No applications or supportive application documents will be accepted beyond application deadline.

*Satisfying the required criteria for application into the Radiologic Technology program is the responsibility of the student.  Students should use their resources, plan accordingly and be cognitive of meeting requirements with their best ability as the program is a competitive admissions program and is not able to admit all students despite best efforts of all parties involved.

Students are enrolled in clinical courses in each semester he/she is enrolled in the program. Regular clinical hours may extend from 7:00 AM to 7:00 PM M-F. Limited weekend rotations will also be assigned. Depending on where you live travel time to clinical sites can be up to 90-120 minutes.  Students must make any personal arrangements necessary for such clinical assignments. All students will be required to complete the weekend rotations.

 

Program Effectiveness Data

 

Credentialing Examination (American Registry of Radiologic Technologists)

Based on first attempt within 6 months of graduation

 

Year                     Passing Percentage                         Number of Students

2014                     50% on first attempt                       3 of 6 students passed on 1st attempt

 

Job Placement Rate

Based upon those actively seeking employment within 12 months of graduation

 

Year                       Job Placement Percentage          Number of students

2014                       100%                                                     6 of 6 employed

 

Program Completion Rate

 

Year                       # completed program    Number of students

2014                       6                                              8 enrolled / 2 withdrew

 

 

Comparative Data from the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology

 

 

 

 

Course Overview

Contact Hours
Credit Hours
General Core Curriculum (15 hours)
3
45
Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience.
Introduces the major fields of contemporary psychology. Emphasis is on fundamental principles of psychology as a science. Topics include research design, the organization and operation of the nervous system, sensation and perception, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, thinking and intelligence, lifespan development, personality, psychopathology and interventions, stress and health, and social psychology.
MATH
1111
3
45
Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry.
Explores the philosophic and artistic heritage of humanity expressed through a historical perspective on visual arts, music, and literature. The humanities provide insight into people and society. Topics include historical and cultural developments, contributions of the humanities, and research.
SPCH
1101
3
45
Introduces the student to the fundamentals of oral communication. Topics include selection and organization of materials, preparation and delivery of individual and group presentations, analysis of ideas presented by others, and professionalism.
Non General Core Curriculum (8 hours)
3
45
Introduces the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the development of a systemic perspective of anatomical structures and physiological processes. Topics include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous and sensory systems.
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2113. The laboratory exercises for this course include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous sensory systems.
Continues the study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and reproductive system.
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2114. The laboratory exercises for this course include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and reproductive system.
Pre-Requisite Occupational Curriculum (5 hours)
Introduces the elements of medical terminology. Emphasis is placed on building familiarity with medical words through knowledge of roots, prefixes, and suffixes. Topics include: origins (roots, prefixes, and suffixes), word building, abbreviations and symbols, and terminology related to the human anatomy.
3
75
Introduces the fundamental concepts, terminology, and operations necessary to use computers. Emphasis is placed on basic functions and familiarity with computer use. Topics include an introduction to computer terminology, the Windows environment, Internet and email, word processing software, spreadsheet software, database software, and presentation software.
Occupational Core Curriculum (63 hours)
4
60
Introduces a grouping of fundamental principles, practices, and issues common to many specializations in the health care profession. In addition to the essential skills, students explore various delivery systems and related issues. Provides the student with an overview of radiography and patient care. Students will be oriented to the radiographic profession as a whole. Emphasis will be placed on patient care with consideration of both physical and psychological conditions. Introduces a grouping of fundamental principles, practices, and issues common to many specializations in the health care profession. In addition to the essential skills, students explore various delivery systems and related issues. Topics include: ethics, medical and legal considerations, Right to Know Law, professionalism, basic principles of radiation protection, basic principles of exposure, equipment introduction, health care delivery systems, hospital and departmental organization, hospital and technical college affiliation, medical emergencies, pharmacology/contrast agents, media, OR and mobile procedures patient preparation, death and dying, body mechanics/transportation, basic life support/CPR, and patient care in radiologic sciences.
3
75
Introduces the knowledge required to perform radiologic procedures applicable to the human anatomy. Emphasis will be placed on the production of quality radiographs, and laboratory experience will demonstrate the application of theoretical principles and concepts. Topics include: introduction to radiographic procedures; positioning terminology; positioning considerations; procedures, anatomy, and topographical anatomy related to body cavities, bony thorax, upper extremities, shoulder girdle; and lower extremities.
Continues to develop the knowledge required to perform radiographic procedures. Topics include: anatomy and routine projections of the pelvic girdle; anatomy and routine projections of the spine, gastrointestinal (GI) procedures; genitourinary (GU) procedures; biliary system procedures; and minor procedures.
6
105
Content is designed to establish a basic knowledge of atomic structure and terminology. Also presented are the nature and characteristics of radiation, x-ray production and the fundamentals of photon interactions with matter. Factors that govern the image production process, film imaging with related accessories, and a basis for analyzing radiographic images. Included are the importance of minimum imaging standards, discussion of a problem-solving technique for image evaluation and the factors that can affect image quality. Actual images will be included for analysis.
6
105
Content is designed to impart an understanding of the components, principles and operation of digital imaging systems found in diagnostic radiology. Factors that impact image acquisition, display, archiving and retrieval are discussed. Guidelines for selecting exposure factors and evaluating images within a digital system assist students to bridge between film-based and digital imaging systems, with a knowledge base in radiographic, fluoroscopic, mobile and tomographic equipment requirements and design. This content also provides a basic knowledge of quality control, principles of digital system quality assurance and maintenance are presented. Content is designed to provide entry-level radiography students with principles related to computed tomography (CT) imaging, and other imaging modalities (i.e., MRI, US, NM, Mammography) in terms of purpose, principles, equipment/material, and procedure. Topics include: imaging equipment, digital image acquisition and display, and basic principles of CT and other imaging modalities. Topics include: imaging equipment, digital image acquisition and display, and basic principles of CT and other imaging modalities
Provides instruction on the principles of cell radiation interaction. Radiation effects on cells and factors affecting cell response are presented. Acute and chronic effects of radiation are discussed. Topics include: radiation detection and measurement; patient protection; personnel protection; absorbed dose equivalencies; agencies and regulations; introduction to radiation biology; cell anatomy, radiation/cell interaction; and effects of radiation.
4
180
Introduces students to the hospital clinical setting and provides an opportunity for students to participate in or observe radiographic procedures. Topics include: orientation to hospital areas and procedures; orientation to mobile/surgery; orientation to radiography and fluoroscopy; participation in and/or observation of procedures related to body cavities, the shoulder girdle, and upper extremities. Activities of students are under direct supervision.
7
315
Continues introductory student learning experiences in the hospital setting. Topics include: equipment utilization; exposure techniques; attend to and/or observation of routine projections of the lower extremities, pelvic girdle, and spine; attend to and/or observation of procedures related to the gastrointestinal (GI), genitourinary (GU), and biliary systems; and attend to and/or observation of procedure related to minor radiologic procedures. Execution of radiographic procedures will be conducted under direct and indirect supervision.
2
30
Content is designed to introduce the student to concepts related to disease and etiological considerations. Pathology and disease as they relate to various radiographic procedures are discussed with emphasis on radiographic appearance of disease and impact on exposure factor selection. Topics include: fundamentals of pathology, trauma/physical injury, and systematic classification of disease.
Provides a review of basic knowledge from previous courses and helps the student prepare for national certification examinations for radiographers. Topics include: image production and evaluation; radiographic procedures; anatomy, physiology, pathology, and terminology; equipment operation and quality control; radiation protection; and patient care and education.
6
270
Provides students with continued hospital setting work experience. Students continue to develop proficiency in executing procedures introduced in Radiographic Procedures. Topics include: patient care; behavioral and social competencies; performance and/or observation of minor special procedures, special equipment use, and participation in and/or observation of cranial and facial radiography. Execution of radiographic procedures will be conducted under direct and indirect supervision.
7
315
Provides students with continued hospital setting work experience. Students continue to develop proficiency in executing procedures introduced in Radiographic Procedures. Topics include: sterile techniques; participation in and/or observation of minor special procedures, special equipment use, and genitourinary system procedures; and participation in and/or observation of cranial and facial radiography; and competency completion evaluation. Execution of radiographic procedures will be conducted under direct and indirect supervision.
9
405
Provides students with continued hospital setting work experience. Students demonstrate increased proficiency levels in skills introduced in all of the radiographic procedures courses and practiced in previous clinical radiography courses. Topics include: patient care; behavioral and social competency; advanced radiographic anatomy; equipment utilization; exposure techniques; sterile techniques; integration of procedures and/or observation of angiographic, interventional, minor special procedures; integration of procedures and/or observation of special equipment use; integration of procedures and/or observation of routine and special radiographic procedures; and final completion of all required clinical competencies. Execution of radiographic procedures will be conducted under direct and indirect supervision.