At a Glance:

Contact: Dr. Katrina, Walker, RN, Program Director
Email: kwalker@atlantatech.edu
Direct: (404) 225-4645

The Associate of Science in Nursing Degree (ASN) program at Atlanta Technical College is a sequence of courses that prepares students for positions in the nursing profession. The curriculum is designed to produce highly trained, technically advanced, competent and caring individuals who are prepared to practice professional nursing in a variety of healthcare settings. The purpose of the ASN program is to provide the learner with the necessary knowledge, skills, and attitudes to practice competently and safely as a beginning nurse generalist in a variety of acute and long-term care settings. The nurse is viewed as a caring, holistic person who possesses critical thinking/problem solving skills, integrity, accountability, a theoretical knowledge base, refined psychomotor skills, and a commitment to life-long learning. Program graduates receive an Associate of Science in Nursing Degree (RN).

Minimum Program Length: 5 Semesters

Estimated Program Cost: $12,000

 

Course Overview

Contact Hours
Credit Hours
General Education Courses (24 hours)
3
45
Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience.
Introduces the major fields of contemporary psychology. Emphasis is on fundamental principles of psychology as a science. Topics include research design, the organization and operation of the nervous system, sensation and perception, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, thinking and intelligence, lifespan development, personality, psychopathology and interventions, stress and health, and social psychology.
Natural Sciences/Mathematics (15 hours)
MATH
1111
3
45
Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry.
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2113. The laboratory exercises for this course include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous sensory systems.
3
45
Introduces the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Emphasis is placed on the development of a systemic perspective of anatomical structures and physiological processes. Topics include body organization, cell structure and functions, tissue classifications, integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous and sensory systems.
Continues the study of the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and reproductive system.
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2114. The laboratory exercises for this course include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, blood and lymphatic system, immune system, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, and reproductive system.
3
45
Provides students with a foundation in basic microbiology with emphasis on infectious disease. Topics include microbial diversity, microbial cell biology, microbial genetics, interactions and impact of microorganisms and humans, microorganisms and human disease.
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2117. The laboratory exercises for this course include microbial diversity, microbial cell biology, microbial genetics, interactions and impact of microorganisms and humans, and microorganisms and human disease.
Select One of the Following (3 hours)
Explores the philosophic and artistic heritage of humanity expressed through a historical perspective on visual arts, music, and literature. The humanities provide insight into people and society. Topics include historical and cultural developments, contributions of the humanities, and research.
3
45
Emphasizes American literature as a reflection of culture and ideas. A survey of important works in American literature. Includes a variety of literary genres: short stories, poetry, drama, nonfiction, and novels. Topics include literature and culture, essential themes and ideas, literature and history, and research skills.
Occupational Courses (45 hours)
7
195

Using classroom, laboratory, and clinical experiences, this course focuses on the implementation of the nursing process.  Program content examines selected predictable stressors causing illness in adult clients in the context of the Orem\'s Theory and outcomes and competencies of associate degree graduates.  Emphasis is on normal aging, as well as system instability in the perioperative clients and alterations in health patterns of clients experiencing common predictable respiratory, cardiovascular, endocrine, neurological, musculoskeletal, integumentary, and acid-base stressors.  Students discuss the effects of chronic illness and strategies for coping with these illnesses.  Students are taught an approach to nursing care which takes into consideration client centered health care, human diversity, safe and effective care environment and effective organizational transitions.  Pharmacologic concepts include medication administration and the use of pharmacologic agents in the treatment of system instability.  Student clinical assignments focus on adult clients experiencing selected predictable stressors causing illness. 

Professional Practice II is developed utilizing Orem\'s Self-Care theory as the conceptual basis for the nursing care of clients across the life span. The purpose of this course is to develop the skills necessary for the Associate of Science (AS) nursing student to complete a holistic assessment including physiological, spiritual, cultural, psychological, and developmental components. The course focuses on the role of the AS nurse as patient/family/community advocate; provider of safe, quality care; and educator.  Emphasis is placed on the skills and clinical reasoning necessary to assess diverse clients/patients across the lifespan. Students are provided with a variety of learning experiences for initiating and implementing change in nursing approaches to client care. Students will integrate this knowledge in the provision of client centered care, human diversity, as well as safe and effective care environments for clients and their families in the practice setting. All clinical laboratories are under supervision of professional nurse faculty; clinical laboratory preceded and followed by group seminar. Theoretical concepts and clinical nursing skills contained in this course are consistent with the skills standards developed for the State of Georgia. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, are part of the course.

RNSG
1304
3
45

This course introduces foundational knowledge and skills needed to understand pharmacological principles in client care.  Emphasis is placed on the theoretical aspects of pharmacology required by nurses to meet the educative-developmental and partial compensatory self-care needs of clients across the life span.

8
210

This course focuses on the implementation of the nursing process with adult clients requiring partial compensatory and total compensatory nursing care as described by Orem.  Program content examines selected predictable stressors causing illness in adult clients in the context of the Orem\'s Self-Care Theory. Normal aging is emphasized to assist the learner in recognizing deviations from normal.  Systems instability in the perioperative clients and alterations in client health patterns related to common and predictable respiratory, cardiovascular, endocrine, neurological, musculoskeletal, integumentary, and acid-base stressors are discussed.  The effects of chronic illness and strategies for coping with these illnesses are also presented.  Students learn an approach to nursing care that incorporates a client-centered approach, respect for human diversity, and  provision of a safe and effective care environment. Student Clinical assignments focus on the nursing care of adult clients with illnesses experiencing selected related to predictable stressors. 

This course utilizes Orem\'s Self-Care Theory of Nursing and the nursing process to focus on developmental self care requisites and social interactions of clients experiencing psychiatric/mental health alterations across the life span.  The student\'s ability to apply the nursing process is further expanded to care of clients of diverse populations.  Orem\'s nursing systems of care; total compensatory, partial compensatory, and supportive-educative, are explored as they relate to therapeutic nursing interventions for each respective area.  A variety of clinical and simulated learning experiences are provided to reinforce theoretical content and enhance critical thinking.   Directed clinical experiences are provided concurrently with theoretical content.

4
240

This course is based on Orem\'s Self-Care theory as applied to the nursing care of the childbearing family and newborn infant. Emphasis is placed on the theory and clinical practice experiences required to meet the educative-developmental and partial compensatory self-care needs of women, newborn infants, and families. Theory addresses normal and abnormal physiological and  psychosocial processes and the influence of cultural practices related to pregnancy, fetal development,  labor & birth, postpartum, newborn transition to extrauterine environment and the family system and the care required to assure positive client outcomes.  Students have opportunities to apply the nursing process with antepartum, intrapartum, postpartum, and newborn clients and their families in a variety of practice settings.

4
240

The Childrearing Family course is developed utilizing Orem\'s Self-Care theory as the conceptual basis for the nursing care of the childrearing family. Emphasis is placed on the theory and clinical experience required to meet the educative-developmental, partial compensatory and total compensatory self-care needs of the child and family.  Consideration is given to various stages of growth and development across the life cycle where clients and families are adapting to stressors. Students are provided with a variety of learning experiences for initiating and implementing change in nursing approaches to client care. Students will integrate this knowledge in the provision of client centered care, human diversity, as well as safe and effective care environments for clients and their families in the pediatric practice setting. All clinical laboratories are under supervision of professional nurse faculty; clinical laboratory preceded and followed by group seminar. Theoretical concepts and clinical nursing skills contained in this course are consistent with the skills standards developed for the State of Georgia. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, are part of the course.

This course uses the Orem\'s Self-Care theory and roles of the associate degree nurse to guide students\' implementation of the nursing process with adult clients experiencing complex predictable stressors.  The course emphasizes partial and total compensatory care of adult clients with alterations in health status arising from the pathophysiological changes in respiratory, cardiovascular, burns, neurologic, sensory, and renal stressors. Students integrate this knowledge in the provision of client centered health care, human diversity, safe and effective care environment for clients in the critical care practice setting with assigned faculty.

Professional Practice VI is developed utilizing Orem\'s Self-Care theory as the conceptual basis for the nursing care of the adult patient. This course is a continuation of role development with utilization/implementation of the nursing process in the care of various adult patients. Emphasis is placed on the theory and clinical experience required to meet the educative-developmental and partial compensatory self-care needs of the client. Consideration is given to various stages of growth and development across the life cycle where patients and families are adapting to stressors. Students are provided with a variety of learning experiences for initiating and implementing change in nursing approaches to client care. The students\' clinical experience/practicum will be facilitated through direct supervision clinical/hospital based preceptors.. Theoretical concepts and clinical nursing skills contained in this course are consistent with the skills standards developed for the State of Georgia. Writing assignments, as appropriate to the discipline, are part of the course.