At a Glance:

Contact: Barry Bates
Barry Bates, Program Coordinator - Bioscience Technology
Phone: 404-225-4583
Email:
Campus: Main
Department: Academic Affairs, Academic Affairs, Health & Public Safety Technologies Division
, Program Coordinator
Email: bbates@atlantatech.edu
Direct: (404) 225-4583

 

 

Bioscience Technology

Program Overview

The Bioscience Technology associate degree prepares graduates to perform a number of biotechnology related careers, including laboratory research, and skills to work in sophisticated biotechnology manufacturing settings.  Bioscience encompasses many critical areas of research on living organisms including development of drugs and medical devices, criminal forensics, environmental science, and agricultural biotechnology.  This program focuses principally on advanced biochemistry and biotechnology laboratory skills, such as analytical DNA, RNA, and protein techniques, cell culture, and microbiology.  Our educational approach emphasizes critical-thinking and problem-solving skills.

For additional information visit page http://www.atlantatech.edu/Bioscience.php 

Minimum Program Length: 6 Semesters

Estimated Program Cost: $6,807

Entrance Requirements

ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS

  • Must be 18 years of age
  • Completion of high school diploma or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply
  • Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math
  • Transfer of previous post secondary credits will be determined by the registrar.
Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

The skill set provided by this program is required to work in laboratories at research universities, biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies, many major research hospitals and government laboratories and agencies. Additionally, these same skills are required to work at food production companies and biomanufacturing facilities that produce pharmaceuticals and vaccines for both humans and animals.  Designing new medications and medical devices, improving the environment, enhancing food yield and quality as these are samples of the work that bioscientists perform.

SALARY POTENTIAL

Minimum: $38,000

PROGRAM ADDITIONAL FEES (Cost are estimated and are subject to change): Books & Supplies: $1,500.00 and Uniform:$100.00

Blood and Airborne Pathogens: Students enrolled in Category I and II programs at Atlanta Technical College will be performing tasks in which there is a normal occurrence for exposure to blood, other potentially infectious body materials, and airborne pathogens. These tasks will be performed in the classroom, laboratory, and clinical activities for each occupational training program/course. Students will be required to present documentation of Hepatitis B and Tuberculosis immunizations as a result of potential occupational exposure. Students should contact their program directors for more information. Policies and procedures regarding blood and airborne pathogens may be reviewed at www.tcsg.org/tcsgpolicy/menu.html

 

Course Overview

Contact Hours
Credit Hours
Curriculum (66 - 68 hours)
General Education Courses (12 hours)
3
45
Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience.
3
45
Explores the sociological analysis of society, its culture, and structure. Sociology is presented as a science with emphasis placed on its methodology and theoretical foundations. Topics include basic sociological concepts, socialization, social interaction and culture, social groups and institutions, deviance and social control, social stratification, social change, and marriage and family.
MATH
1111
3
45
Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry.
Explores the philosophic and artistic heritage of humanity expressed through a historical perspective on visual arts, music, and literature. The humanities provide insight into people and society. Topics include historical and cultural developments, contributions of the humanities, and research.
Occupational Courses (47 hours)
3
75
Introduces the fundamental concepts, terminology, and operations necessary to use computers. Emphasis is placed on basic functions and familiarity with computer use. Topics include an introduction to computer terminology, the Windows environment, Internet and email, word processing software, spreadsheet software, database software, and presentation software.
Introduction to and survey of the broad range of activities in bioscience technology. Major applications and advances in pharmaceuticals, medical devices, genomics, forensics, proteomics, agriculture, and environmental science will be covered. Including an in depth examination and discussion of ethical, legal and hands-on activities based on authentic bioscience applications. There is a survey of technical and regulatory aspects of physical, chemical, radiation and biological safety in the bioscience laboratory.
3
45
An introduction to the basic concepts of federal regulation of bioscience/ biotechnology research and biomanufacturing. The structure and purview of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Environmental Protection Agency and Occupation Safety and Health Administration will be covered. This course will also focus on the regulation of product produced in the life science sector including strategic planning, compliance, validation and documentation of production. Students will gain an understanding of the role of regulatory affairs in the overall business scheme. Differences between the regulatory requirements of the U.S. market compared to the European and Asian markets will be examined.
4
120
Develop and exercise the skill of solving typical problems in executing chemical and biological laboratory procedures. This course focuses on common lab challenges and failure modes. Instruction and exercises will target the anticipation and prevention of errors. Students will receive ample hands-on experience at the bench trouble-shooting and devising solutions.
A survey of common laboratory methodologies currently used in bioscience, and how to collect, assess and analyze data from these various methods. Methods examined include nucleic acid extraction, purification and characterization, PCR, Real-time PCR, ELISA, bacterial transformation, restriction digest and analysis. Students learn to analyze sequences, select primers and utilize polymerase chain reaction as a diagnostic tool.
5
135
Students are introduced to major topics in biochemistry and cell biology, including biomolecules, enzymology, cellular anatomy and function, stimulus-effect coupling, molecular biology, principal topics in intermediary metabolism, plant cell structure and physiology, cancer, and a basic overview of immunology. The course establishes a working knowledge of these areas and integrates these diverse topics into a useful and comprehensive survey of mammalian and plant structure and function. The course includes a laboratory component that will familiarize students with common lab practices in biochemistry and cell biology. The entire course will emphasize critical-thinking and problem-solving skills.
BIOL
1111
3
45
Provides an introduction to basic biological concepts with a focus on living cells. Topics include chemical principles related to cells, cell structure and function, energy and metabolism, cell division, protein synthesis, genetics, and biotechnology.
BIOL
1111
1
45
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 1111. The laboratory exercises for this course include chemical principles related to cells, cell structure and function, energy and metabolism, cell division, protein synthesis, genetics, and biotechnology.
3
45
Provides students with a foundation in basic microbiology with emphasis on infectious disease. Topics include microbial diversity, microbial cell biology, microbial genetics, interactions and impact of microorganisms and humans, microorganisms and human disease.
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in BIOL 2117. The laboratory exercises for this course include microbial diversity, microbial cell biology, microbial genetics, interactions and impact of microorganisms and humans, and microorganisms and human disease.
CHEM
1211
3
45
Provides an introduction to basic chemical principles and concepts which explain the behavior of matter. Topics include measurement, physical and chemical properties of matter, atomic structure, chemical bonding, nomenclature, chemical reactions, and stoichiometry and gas laws.
CHEM
1211
1
45
Selected laboratory exercises paralleling the topics in CHEM 1211. The laboratory exercises for this course include measurement, physical and chemical properties of matter, atomic structure, chemical bonding, nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry and gas laws.
CHEM
1212
3
45
Continues the exploration of basic chemical principles and concepts. Topics include equilibrium theory, kinetics, thermodynamics, solution chemistry, acid-base theory, and nuclear chemistry.
CHEM
1212
1
45
Emphasizes practical knowledge of technical communications techniques, procedures, and reporting formats used in industry and business.  Topics include reference use and research, device and process description, formal technical report writing, business correspondence, and technical report presentation.
3
45
This course is the first of a two-semester sequence on the organic chemistry of alkanes, alkenes and their substitution products, reactions, nomenclature, functional groups and electron structure.
1
45
In this laboratory course, students perform experiments to illustrate the reactions, principles and techniques presented in Organic Chemistry I.  Students gain experience in synthesis and techniques relating to isolation, purification and identification of organic compounds.
3
45

This course focuses on developing a strong understanding of the principles of analytical chemistry and the applications of these principles to disciplines ranging from the life sciences to environmental science. This course presents a comprehensive assessment of the theory, application, and the strategies and calculations needed for proper data analysis regarding analytical chemistry. The course first focuses on the traditional techniques utilized in quantitative chemical analysis to quantify the amount of a particular analyte present in unknown samples. Other topics relate to the methods and techniques used for the separation and isolation of various classes of substrates.

This laboratory course provides relative application of topics covered in CHEM 2300. The laboratory course introduces basic experimental analytical techniques and concepts associated with quantitative measurements. Laboratory activities provide hands-on training in threefundamental areas of analytical chemistry including gravimetric analysis and titrations, spectrophotometric techniques used to calculate unknown quantities of analytes in various samples, and chromatographic separation techniques used to separate and isolate various classes of substrates.

Program Specific Electives-Select Three of the Following (7 - 9 hours)
This course provides an overview of documentation and validation concepts used within a biomanufacturing facility. Emphasis will be placed on source documentation, writing and executing Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs), process and equipment validation, as well as validation of bulk starting materials. A hands-on laboratory-based course that will familiarize students with some basic procedures and techniques common to laboratories involved with work that is covered by Quality Systems Regulation (QSR) and current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP). The principles of Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) and effective documentation procedures will be stressed.
This course is an introduction to the steps of development of products produced by microorganisms using biotechnology and genetic engineering which include; biopharmaceuticals, vaccines, enzymes and food ingredients. It will also introduce the various career opportunities involved in bioprocessing. Lectures will emphasize: how genetically altered microorganisms are used in drug development, methods used for manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals, vaccines, enzymes and food ingredients, biopharmaceutical process development, the design of biomanufacturing equipment and facilities, how bioprocesses are regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA regulatory compliance), an introduction to bionanomaterials, and an introduction to scientific, engineering, regulatory compliance and business careers in biomanufacturing.
This course will prepare students to understand the scope of environmental testing and the work of technologists who perform these duties. Students will learn to collect, store, and transport environmental samples, and describe the major analytical procedures applied to these samples in the environmental lab. Data reduction and reporting will be discussed.
3
90
This course provides an overview of environmental contamination and pollution. Students will define contamination and pollution issues including sources, spread, and hazards to living and non-living entities. Regulatory affairs related to these issues, including federal, state and local laws, code, and regulations will be reviewed. Current best practices in remediation of environmental contamination and pollution will be covered.
The internship experience is working 300 hours in an approved laboratory environment. The experience consists of working in the laboratory as a technician operating instruments, running samples, maintaining a laboratory notebook, etc. The intern makes detailed observations, analyzes data and interprets results. Interns prepare technical reports, summaries, protocols, and quantitative analyses. They maintain familiarity with current scientific literature and contribute to the process of the laboratory.
3
135

The course aims at giving students lab research experience in one or more of the following topics: molecular biology,

microbiology, ecology,biochemistry, structural biology or cellular biology by introducing students to a variety of research

techniques and their applications. Thecourse is intended for biology, chemistry and bioscience students seeking to 

acquire basic and advanced training in life science-related fields.This course will provide instruction for understanding 

many biochemical and molecular techniques used in biotechnology and pharmaceuticalindustries. Students will be required

to present their work in departmental seminars or scientific meetings, possibly publishing researchoutcomes in scientific journals.

3
45
This course is a continuation of Organic Chemistry I. Topics include spectroscopy, aromatic compounds and a survey of carbonyl compounds and their reactions. Instructors emphasize bioorganic compounds as they relate to biological structure and function.
1
45
In this laboratory course, students perform experiments to illustrate the reactions, principles and techniques presented in Organic Chemistry II. Students gain additional experience in instrumentation, synthesis and techniques relating to isolation and purification. They also expand their capabilities relating to the identification of organic compounds.