At a Glance:

Contact: Mortissa Harvey
Mortissa Harvey, Instructor, Criminal Justice
Phone: 404-225-4577
Email:
Campus: Main
Department: Business & Public Service Technologies Division
, Program Chair
Email: mharvey@atlantatech.edu
Direct: (404) 225-4577

 

Criminal Justice Technology

Program Overview

The Criminal Justice Technology Degree program emphasizes a combination of criminal justice theory and practical application necessary for successful employment as well as continued educational advancement to a four-year institution. Graduates who are current practitioners will benefit through enhancement of career potential. Entry-level persons will be prepared to pursue diverse opportunities in the corrections, security, investigative, and police administration fields. Completion of the Criminal Justice Technology Associate Degree does not ensure certification of officer status in Georgia. Students must seek such certification from the Peace Officer Standards and Training (P.O.S.T.) Council.

Minimum Program Length = 4 Semesters

Estimated Program Cost $9,998

Entrance Requirements

Admissions Requirements
  • Must be 16 years of age
  • Completion of high school or GED and submission of official transcript required to apply
  • Achievement of minimum program admission scores in Reading, English, and Math
  • Transfer of previous post secondary credits will be determined by the registrar
  • Student Performance/Graduation Requirements: Students must maintain a 2.0 grade point average and complete all required courses to graduate


 

Course Overview

Contact Hours
Credit Hours
General Education Courses (15 hours)
3
45
Explores the analysis of literature and articles about issues in the humanities and in society. Students practice various modes of writing, ranging from exposition to argumentation and persuasion. The course includes a review of standard grammatical and stylistic usage in proofreading and editing. An introduction to library resources lays the foundation for research. Topics include writing analysis and practice, revision, and research. Students write a research paper using library resources and using a formatting and documentation style appropriate to the purpose and audience.
Select One of the Following (3 hours)
3
45
Provides a description and analysis of economic operations in contemporary society. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of economic concepts and policies as they apply to everyday life. Topics include basic economic principles; economic forces and indicators; capital and labor; price, competition, and monopoly; money and banking; government expenditures, federal and local; fluctuations in production, employment, and income; and United States economy in perspective
Introduces the major fields of contemporary psychology. Emphasis is on fundamental principles of psychology as a science. Topics include research design, the organization and operation of the nervous system, sensation and perception, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, thinking and intelligence, lifespan development, personality, psychopathology and interventions, stress and health, and social psychology.
3
45
Emphasizes study of government and politics in the United States. The focus of the course will provide an overview of the Constitutional foundations of the American political processes with a focus on government institutions and political procedures. The course will examine the constitutional framework, federalism, civil liberties and civil rights, public opinion, the media, special interest groups, political parties, and the election process along with the three branches of government. In addition, this course will examine the processes of Georgia state government. Topics include foundations of government, political behavior, and governing institutions.
3
45
Explores the sociological analysis of society, its culture, and structure. Sociology is presented as a science with emphasis placed on its methodology and theoretical foundations. Topics include basic sociological concepts, socialization, social interaction and culture, social groups and institutions, deviance and social control, social stratification, social change, and marriage and family.
Select One of the Following (3 hours)
Emphasizes algebra, statistics, and mathematics of finance. Topics include fundamental operations of algebra, sets and logic, probability and statistics, geometry, mathematics of voting and districting, and mathematics of finance.
3
45
Emphasizes functions using real-world applications as models. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra; functions and graphs; linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions and models; systems of equations; and optional topics in algebra.
MATH
1111
3
45
Emphasizes techniques of problem solving using algebraic concepts. Topics include fundamental concepts of algebra, equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, and systems of equations; optional topics include sequences, series, and probability or analytic geometry.
Select One of the Following (3 hours)
3
45
Emphasizes the student\\\'s ability to read literature analytically and meaningfully and to communicate clearly. Students analyze the form and content of literature in historical and philosophical contexts. Topics include reading and analysis of fiction, poetry, and drama; research; and writing about literature.
3
45
Emphasizes American literature as a reflection of culture and ideas. A survey of important works in American literature. Includes a variety of literary genres: short stories, poetry, drama, nonfiction, and novels. Topics include literature and culture, essential themes and ideas, literature and history, and research skills.
SPCH
1101
3
45
Introduces the student to the fundamentals of oral communication. Topics include selection and organization of materials, preparation and delivery of individual and group presentations, analysis of ideas presented by others, and professionalism.
3
45
Provides a description and analysis of economic operations in contemporary society. Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of economic concepts and policies as they apply to everyday life. Topics include basic economic principles; economic forces and indicators; capital and labor; price, competition, and monopoly; money and banking; government expenditures, federal and local; fluctuations in production, employment, and income; and United States economy in perspective
Introduces the major fields of contemporary psychology. Emphasis is on fundamental principles of psychology as a science. Topics include research design, the organization and operation of the nervous system, sensation and perception, learning and memory, motivation and emotion, thinking and intelligence, lifespan development, personality, psychopathology and interventions, stress and health, and social psychology.
3
45
Explores the sociological analysis of society, its culture, and structure. Sociology is presented as a science with emphasis placed on its methodology and theoretical foundations. Topics include basic sociological concepts, socialization, social interaction and culture, social groups and institutions, deviance and social control, social stratification, social change, and marriage and family.
Explores the philosophic and artistic heritage of humanity expressed through a historical perspective on visual arts, music, and literature. The humanities provide insight into people and society. Topics include historical and cultural developments, contributions of the humanities, and research.
ARTS
1101
3
45
Explores the visual arts and the relationship to human needs and aspirations. Students investigate the value of art, themes in art, the elements and principles of composition, and the materials and processes used for artistic expression. Well-known works of visual art are explored. The course encourages student interest in the visual arts beyond the classroom.
Select One of the Following (3 hours)
ARTS
1101
3
45
Explores the visual arts and the relationship to human needs and aspirations. Students investigate the value of art, themes in art, the elements and principles of composition, and the materials and processes used for artistic expression. Well-known works of visual art are explored. The course encourages student interest in the visual arts beyond the classroom.
Explores the philosophic and artistic heritage of humanity expressed through a historical perspective on visual arts, music, and literature. The humanities provide insight into people and society. Topics include historical and cultural developments, contributions of the humanities, and research.
3
45
Emphasizes American literature as a reflection of culture and ideas. A survey of important works in American literature. Includes a variety of literary genres: short stories, poetry, drama, nonfiction, and novels. Topics include literature and culture, essential themes and ideas, literature and history, and research skills.
Occupational Courses (45 - 47 hours)
Introduces the development and organization of the criminal justice system in the Untied States.  Topics: include the American criminal justice system; constitutional limitations;organization of enforcement, adjudication, and corrections; and career opportunities and requirements.
CRJU
1030
3
45
Provides an anlaysis of all phases of the American correctional system and practices, including its history, procedures, and objectives.  Topics include: history and evolution of correctional facilities; legal and administrative problems; institutional facilitites and procedures; probabtion, parole, and prerelease programs; alternative sentencing; rehabilitation; community involvement; and staffing.
This course examines the principles of the organization, administration, and duties of federal, state and local law enforcement agencies.  Topics include: history and philosphy of law enforcement, evaluation of administrative practices, problems in American law enforcement agencies, emerging concepts, professionalism, and community crime prevention programs.

This course introduces criminal law in the United States, but emphasizes the current specific status of Georgia criminal law.  The course will focus on the most current statutory contents of the Official Code of Georgia Annotated (O.C.G.A.) with primary emphasis on the criminal and traffic codes.  Topics include: historic development of criminal law in the United States; statutory law, Georgia Code (O.C.G.A.) Title 40-Motor Vehicle and Traffic Offenses; and Supreme Court rulings that apply to criminal law.

This course provides an exploration ethics and cultural perspectives in criminal justice. In presenting ethics, both the individual perspective and the organizational standpoint will be examined. Four areas of ethical decision making opportunities are studied including: law enforcement ethics; correctional ethics; legal profession ethics; and policymaking ethics. The presentation of cultural perspectives is designed to aid law enforcement officers to better understand and communicate with members of other cultures with whom they come in contact in the line of duty. Topics include: defining and applying terms related to intercultural attitudes, role-play activities related to intercultural understanding, developing interpersonal/intercultural communication competence, and development of personal intercultural growth plan.

This course emphasizes those provisions of the Bill of Rights which pertain to criminal justice.  Topics include: characteristics and powers of the three branches of government; principles governing the operation of the U.S. Constitution, the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment.

CRJU
2050
3
45
Introduces the procedural law of the criminal justice system which governs the series of proceedings through which government enforces substantive criminal law.  The course offers an emphasis on the laws of arrest and search and seizure; the rules of evidence, right to counsel, and the right and duties of both citizens and officers.  The course covers in depth appropriate Case Law and court rulings that dictate criminal procedures on the State and Federal Level.
CRJU
2070
3
45

Analyze the nature, extent, and causes of juvenile delinquency, and examines processes in the field of juvenile justice.  Topics include: survey of juvenile law, comparative analysis of adult and juvenile justice systems, and prevention and treatment of juvenile delinquency.

3
135

This course will cover the history of both juvenile and adult probation as well as the history of parole.  The probation and parole systems will be covered generally with a special emphasis on the Georgia systems and related laws.  Topics include: history and philosophy of probation and parole; function of the probation and parole systems; Georgia law related to probation and parole; characteristics and roles of probation and parole officers; and special issues and programs of probation and parole.

3
75
Introduces the fundamental concepts, terminology, and operations necessary to use computers. Emphasis is placed on basic functions and familiarity with computer use. Topics include an introduction to computer terminology, the Windows environment, Internet and email, word processing software, spreadsheet software, database software, and presentation software.
Advisor Guided/Approved Electives (15 - 17 hours)
3
45

This course will cover the history of both juvenile and adult probation as well as the history of parole.  The probation and parole systems will be covered generally with a special emphasis on the Georgia systems and related laws.  Topics include: history and philosophy of probation and parole; function of the probation and parole systems; Georgia law related to probation and parole; characteristics and roles of probation and parole officers; and special issues and programs of probation and parole.

The origin, history and role of forensic science in the investigative process.  Philosophical, rational and practical framework that supports a case investigation will be outlined.  The unifying principles of forensic science, the rooting of forensic science in the pure sciences, and the unique ways in which a forensic scientist must think will also be discussed.  The special areas of forensic science will be explored.

3
45

This course presents the knowledge and skills associated with police patrol operations. Emphasis is placed on patrol techniques, crimes in progress, crisis intervention, domestic disputes, Georgia Crime Information Center procedures, electronics communications and police reports. Topics include: foundations, policing skills and communication skills.

This course explores the managerial aspects of effective and efficient police administration.  Emphasis is directed towards increasing organizational skills and overcoming interdepartmental and inter-agency non-communication.  Topics include: environmental management, human resources, and organizational concerns.

This course presents the fundamentals of criminal investigation.  The duties and responsibilities of the investigator both in field and in the courtyard room are highlighted.  Emphasis is placed on techniques commonly utilized by investigative personnel as well as the procedures used for investigating various crimes.

3
75

This course presents students with practical exercises dealing with investigating crime scenes and gathering various forms of physical evidence.  Emphasis is placed on crime scene assessment, search, fingerprinting, and evidence collection.  Topics include: crime scene management, evidence characteristics, identification, documentation and collections as well as techniques for developing and lifting latent fingerprints.

Presents the fundamentals for the community-oriented policing philosophy, including the comparison of traditional and community policing philosophies; law enforcement and community relationships; importance of political and public support and involvement; attitudinal changes involving the roles of police management, supervisors and line personnel; creation of partnerships with community organizations, businesses, private security, other governmental agencies, and special interest groups; and police problem-solving methodologies. Topics include: foundations of community-oriented policing, partnerships and problem-solving in community-oriented policing, and community-oriented policing projects and programs.

CRJU
2060
3
45

Introduces the nature, extent, and factors related to criminal behavior, and the etiology of criminal offenses and offenders. Topics include: sociological, psychological, and biological causes of crime; effectiveness of theories in explaining crime; theory integration; and application of theory to selected issues.

CRJU
2110
3
45

The course provides an introduction to the principles of homeland security, roles and responsibilities of constituencies and implications for criminal justice fields. Topics include: intelligence and warning, border and transportation security, domestic counterterrorism, protecting critical infrastructure, defending against catastrophic threats, and emergency preparedness and response.

CRJU
2201
3
45

This course examines the historical context on the development, functions, and controversies in the courts system. Topics include: introduction to the courts; participants of a trial; courtroom processes; and the post-conviction process.

This introductory course will provide a broad overview of the areas in forensic science covered in higher level courses. Topics include the recognition, identification, individualization and evaluation of various types of physical evidence, forensic science and the law, and ethics in forensic science. The relationship of forensic science to the natural sciences and the use of the scientific method in forensic science will also be explored.

A study of the methods and techniques of scientific crime scene investigation and analysis using principles from biology, chemistry, and physics to document, recognize, preserve and collect physical evidence. Topics covered include video recording, photography, sketching, and searching of crime scenes along with proper collection and preservation methods.

Bloodstain pattern analysis is a tool used in crime scene investigations to reconstruct events and evaluate statements. Lectures on terminology and theory coupled with practical laboratory exercises will provide students with the basic knowledge of bloodstain pattern analysis. The understanding of scientific principles related to bloodstain pattern analysis and its relation to case work will be explored in addition to the identification and documentation of bloodstains and bloodstain patterns.